Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        First principles and experimental studies of empty Si46 as anode materials for Li-ion batteries – CORRIGENDUM
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        First principles and experimental studies of empty Si46 as anode materials for Li-ion batteries – CORRIGENDUM
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        First principles and experimental studies of empty Si46 as anode materials for Li-ion batteries – CORRIGENDUM
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

doi: 10.1557/jmr.2016.408, Published by Materials Research Society with Cambridge University Press, 17 November 2016.

In Chan et al.1, references 3–17 had several errors and mislabels. The following list is the corrected references:

  1. 3. L.Y. Beaulieu, T.D. Hatchard, A. Bonakdarpour, M.D. Fleischauer, and J.R. Dahn: Reaction of Li with alloy thin films studied by in situ AFM. J. Electrochem. Soc. 150(11), A1457 (2003).

  2. 4. A. Timmons and J.R. Dahn: In situ optical observations of particle motion in alloy negative electrodes for Li-ion batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc. 153, A1206 (2006).

  3. 5. S.D. Beattie, D. Larcher, M. Morcrette, B. Simon, and J.-M. Tarascon: Si electrodes for Li-ion batteries − A new way to look at an old problem. J. Electrochem. Soc. 155(2), A158 (2008).

  4. 6. V.A. Sethuraman, M.J. Chon, M. Shimshak, V. Srinivasan, and P.R. Guduru: In situ measurements of stress evolution in silicon thin films during electrochemical lithiation and delithiation. J. Power Sources 195, 5062 (2010).

  5. 7. J.Y. Eom, J.W. Park, H.S. Kwon, and S. Rajendran: Electrochemical insertion of lithium into multiwalled carbon nanotube/silicon composites produced by ballmilling. J. Electrochem. Soc. 153(9), A1678 (2006).

  6. 8. Y. Zhang, X.G. Zhang, H.L. Zhang, Z.G. Zhao, F. Li, C. Liu, and H.M. Cheng: Composite anode material of silicon/graphite/carbon nanotubes for Li-ion batteries. Electrochim. Acta 51, 4994 (2006).

  7. 9. Y. Zhang, Z.G. Zhao, X.G. Zhang, H.L. Zhang, F. Li, C. Liu, and H.M. Cheng: Pyrolytic carbon-coated silicon/carbon nanotube composites: promising application for Li-ion batteries. Int. J. Nanomanuf. 2(1/2), 4 (2008).

  8. 10. J.H. Ryu, J.W. Kim, Y.-E. Sung, and S.M. Oh: Failure Modes of Silicon Powder Negative Electrode in Lithium Secondary Batteries. Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 7(10), A306 (2004).

  9. 11. R.A. Huggins and W.D. Nix: Decrepitation model for capacity loss during cycling of alloys in rechargeable electrochemical systems. Ionics 6, 57 (2000).

  10. 12. J. Graetz, C.C. Ahn, R. Yazami, and B. Fultz: Highly reversible lithium storage in nanostructured silicon. Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 6(9), A194 (2003).

  11. 13. T. Takamura, S. Ohara, M. Uehara, J. Suzuki, and K. Sekine: A vacuum deposited Si film having a Li extraction capacity over 2000 mAh/g with a long cycle life. J. Power Sources 129, 96 (2004).

  12. 14. H. Kim, B. Han, J. Choo, and J. Cho: Three-dimensional porous silicon particles for use in high-performance lithium secondary batteries. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47, 1 (2008).

  13. 15. M. Green, E. Fielder, B. Scrosati, M. Wachtler, and J.S. Moreno: Structured silicon anodes for lithium battery applications. Electrochem. Solid-State Lett. 6(5), A75 (2003).

  14. 16. C.K. Chan, H. Peng, G. Liu, K. McIlwrath, X.F. Zhang, R.A. Huggins, and Y. Cui: High performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires. Nat. Nanotechnol. 3, 31 (2008).

  15. 17. L.-F. Cui, R. Ruffo, C.K. Chan, H. Peng, and Y. Cui: Crystalline-amorphous core-shell silicon nanowires for high capacity and high current battery electrodes. Nano Lett 9, 491 (2009).

The authors regret these errors.

REFERENCE

1. Chan, K.S., Miller, M.A., Liang, W., Ellis-Terrell, C., Chan, and C.K.: First principles and experimental studies of empty Si46 as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. J Mater. Res. 31(23), 36573665 (2016). doi: 10.1557/jmr.2016.408.