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Critical issues in conducting constant strain rate nanoindentation tests at higher strain rates

  • Benoit Merle (a1), Wesley H. Higgins (a2) and George M. Pharr (a2)

Abstract

Constant strain rate nanoindentation is a popular technique for probing the local mechanical properties of materials but is usually restricted to strain rates ≤0.1 s−1. Faster indentation potentially results in an overestimation of the hardness because of the plasticity error associated with the continuous stiffness measurement (CSM) method. This can have significant consequences in some applications, such as the measurement of strain rate sensitivity. The experimental strain rate range can be extended by increasing the harmonic frequency of the CSM oscillation. However, with commercial instruments, this is achievable only by identifying higher CSM frequencies at which the testing system is dynamically well behaved. Using these principles, a commercial system operated at the unusually high harmonic frequency of 1570 Hz was successfully used to characterize of the strain rate sensitivity of a Zn22Al superplastic alloy at strain rates up to 1 s−1, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than with standard methods.

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Copyright

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Corresponding author

a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: benoit.merle@fau.de

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b)

This author was an editor of this journal during the review and decision stage. For the JMR policy on review and publication of manuscripts authored by editors, please refer to http://www.mrs.org/editor-manuscripts/.

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References

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Keywords

Critical issues in conducting constant strain rate nanoindentation tests at higher strain rates

  • Benoit Merle (a1), Wesley H. Higgins (a2) and George M. Pharr (a2)

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