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Titanium oxide nanotube arrays prepared by anodic oxidation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Dawei Gong
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Research Institute, 208 Materials Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Craig A. Grimes
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Research Institute, 208 Materials Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Oomman K. Varghese
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Research Institute, 208 Materials Research Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Wenchong Hu
Affiliation:
Departments of Material Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
R. S. Singh
Affiliation:
Departments of Material Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Zhi Chen
Affiliation:
Departments of Material Science and Engineering, and Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
Elizabeth C. Dickey
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
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Abstract

Titanium oxide nanotubes were fabricated by anodic oxidation of a pure titanium sheet in an aqueous solution containing 0.5 to 3.5 wt% hydrofluoric acid. These tubes are well aligned and organized into high-density uniform arrays. While the tops of the tubes are open, the bottoms of the tubes are closed, forming a barrier layer structure similar to that of porous alumina. The average tube diameter, ranging in size from 25 to 65 nm, was found to increase with increasing anodizing voltage, while the length of the tube was found independent of anodization time. A possible growth mechanism is presented.

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Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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