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Thermogravimetric analysis of the oxidation resistance of ZrB2–SiC and ZrB2–Sic–TaB2–based compositions in the 1500–1900 °C range

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 January 2011

Fei Peng
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245
Gregg Van Laningham
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245
Robert F. Speyer
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245
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Abstract

Theoretically dense ZrB2–SiC two-phase microstructures were isothermally oxidized for ∼90 min in flowing air in the range 1500–1900 °C. Specimens with 30 mol% SiC formed distinctive reaction product layers that were highly protective; 28 mol% SiC–6 mol% TaB2 performed similarly. At and above 1700 °C, the composition with only 15 mol% SiC oxidized extensively because of deficient silicate liquid formation. Specimens with 60 mol% SiC were resistant to oxidation up to 1800 °C; at 1900 °C, this composition displayed periodic ruptures of the passivating layer by emerging gas bubbles. Oxide coating thicknesses calculated from weight loss data were consistent with those measured from scanning electron microscopy micrographs. A layer of ZrB2 devoid of SiC was argued to be from preferential removal of SiC by reaction of a silica oxidation product with adjacent unreacted SiC to form escaping gases.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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References

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Thermogravimetric analysis of the oxidation resistance of ZrB2–SiC and ZrB2–Sic–TaB2–based compositions in the 1500–1900 °C range
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Thermogravimetric analysis of the oxidation resistance of ZrB2–SiC and ZrB2–Sic–TaB2–based compositions in the 1500–1900 °C range
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