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Thermal transport through thin films: Mirage technique measurements on aluminum/titanium multilayers

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

E. J. Gonzalez
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
J. E. Bonevich
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
G. R. Stafford
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
G. White
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
D. Josell
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899
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Abstract

Thermal transport properties of multilayer thin films both normal and parallel to the layers were measured. Al/Ti multilayer films 3 μm thick, with individual layers systematically varied from 2.5 to 40 nm, were studied on Si substrates. Layers of Al and Ti were nominally equal in thickness, with actual composition determined for each specimen using energy dispersive spectroscopy. The thermal diffusivity both in the plane and normal to the plane of the films (thermal conductivity divided by specific heat per volume) was found to decrease significantly with decreasing bilayer thickness. Pure Ti and Al films as well as Cu films from 0.1 to 5 μm thick were also studied. In-plane electrical conductances of the Al/Ti multilayers were also measured.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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References

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