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Thermal expansion of the new perovskite substrates DyScO3 and GdScO3

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2005

M.D. Biegalski*
Affiliation:
Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
J.H. Haeni
Affiliation:
Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
S. Trolier-McKinstry
Affiliation:
Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
D.G. Schlom
Affiliation:
Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802
C.D. Brandle
Affiliation:
Agere Systems, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974
A.J. Ven Graitis
Affiliation:
Agere Systems, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: biegalsk@psu.edu
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Abstract

The thermal expansion coefficients of DyScO3 and GdScO3 were determined from298 to 1273 K using x-ray diffraction. The average thermal expansion coefficients of DyScO3 and GdScO3 were 8.4 and 10.9 ppm/K, respectively. No phase transitions were detected over this range, though the orthorhombicity decreased with increasing temperature. These thermal expansion coefficients are similar to other oxide perovskites (e.g., BaTiO3 or SrTiO3), making these rare-earth scandates promising substrates for the growth of epitaxial thin films of many oxide perovskites that have similar lattice spacing and thermal expansion coefficients.

Keywords

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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Footnotes

b)

Currently at CrysTex Inc., Basking Ridge, New Jersey.

c)

Currently at Integrated Photonics, Inc., Hillsborough, New Jersey.

References

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