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Temperature calculation for laser irradiation of sol-gel films on oxide substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

D.J. Taylor
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
D.P. Birnie
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
B.D. Fabes
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
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Abstract

A model for estimating the temperature rise in a laser-irradiated oxide target is developed and applied to laser-firing of sol-gel films on oxide substrates. The model incorporates a continuous-wave (CW) Gaussian laser beam translated across a sol-gel film on a semi-infinite substrate. Heat effects due to phase changes are assumed to be absent. In addition, the laser energy is assumed to be absorbed primarily in the substrate material (since many sol-gel films are much thinner than the absorption depth of typical laser wavelengths). The model also takes into account the temperature dependence of the thermal properties of the substrate. The predictions from the model are compared to experimental data from various laser firing experiments. The temperatures predicted by the model are shown to agree well with experimental results.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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