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Synthesis and Characterization of Particle-reinforced Ni/Al2O3 Nanocomposites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

I. Shao
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
P. M. Vereecken
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
C. L. Chien
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
P. C. Searson
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 21218
R. C. Cammarata
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 21218
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Abstract

Nanocomposite Ni/Al2O3 films were electrodeposited from a suspension of Al2O3 nanoparticles in aqueous nickel sulfamate solution. The volume fraction of particles incorporated increased with electrode rotation rate and decreased with deposition current density. The composition, microstructure, hardness, and magnetic properties of these nanocomposite films were characterized. The mechanical strengthening due to particle dispersion in the films was interpreted by considering an Orowan dislocation bowing mechanism. The coercivity of the films increased with increasing particle concentration in the film. The saturation magnetization showed a weak dependence on particle concentration.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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