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Study of Ru barrier failure in the Cu/Ru/Si system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

M. Damayanti
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798; and Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing Ltd., Woodlands Industrial Park D, Singapore 738406
T. Sritharan
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798
S.G. Mhaisalkar
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798
E. Phoon
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798
L. Chan
Affiliation:
Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing Ltd., Woodlands Industrial Park D, Singapore 738406
Corresponding
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Abstract

The reaction mechanisms and related microstructures in the Cu/Si, Ru/Si, and Cu/Ru/Si metallization system were studied experimentally. With the help of sheet resistance measurements, x-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the metallization structure with Ru barrier layer was observed to fail completely at temperatures around 700 °C, regardless of the Ru thickness because of the formation of polycrystalline Ru2Si3 followed by Cu3Si protrusions.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2007

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References

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