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Self-formed pencil-like bulk composite materials consisting of copper alloy and stainless steel

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

C.P. Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, and Research Center for Materials Design and Applications, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China
X.J. Liu*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Materials, and Research Center for Materials Design and Applications, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, People’s Republic of China
I. Ohnuma
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan
R. Kainuma
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan
K. Ishida
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579, Japan
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: lxj@xmu.edu.cn
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Abstract

On the basis of the CALPHAD (Calculation of Phase Diagrams) method, the compositional range of stable miscibility gap and volume fractions of the two liquid phases in the Cu–Fe–Cr–Ni system were predicted, which can provide the guidance for design of self-formed composite materials. Based on such information, the self-formed pencil-like bulk composite materials consisting of copper alloy and two kinds of stainless steels were prepared by controlling the compositions of Cu-rich and Fe-rich phases in immiscible liquid system by the conventional casting process. The experimental results are in good agreement with the ones predicted by calculation. This study indicates that it is possible to develop the pencil-like bulk composite materials consisting of copper alloy and stainless steels by the conventional casting process.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

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