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Role of tempering cooling rate on impact toughness of 2CrMoV weld metal

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020


Tao Fang
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai200240, People's Republic of China
Xia Liu
Affiliation:
Department of Technology Research and Development, Shanghai Turbine Plant of Shanghai Electric Power Generation Equipment Co. Ltd., Shanghai200240, People's Republic of China
Chendong Shao
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai200240, People's Republic of China
Haichao Cui
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai200240, People's Republic of China
Fenggui Lu
Affiliation:
Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai200240, People's Republic of China
Corresponding

Abstract

Tempering cooling rate plays a significant role in the impact toughness of 2CrMoV weld metal. Three different tempering cooling rate experiments were carried out; it is found that the impact toughness of weld metal improved from 44.61 to 117.49 J as the cooling rate increased from 5 to 40 °C/h. Microstructure characterization revealed that the large blocky M–A constituents and cluster precipitation were considered to act as stress concentration sources and cleavage fracture initiators at a cooling rate of 5 °C/h. Under the cooling rate of 20 °C/h, the decrease of blocky M–A constituents as well as homogeneous distribution of precipitation induced the transition from cleavage to interfacial decohesion. The chance of crack propagation in intragranular ferrite matrix was increased, which needed to absorb more energy and improve impact toughness. When the tempering cooling rate reached at 40 °C/h, the cracks mainly propagated in the ferrite matrix; meanwhile, fine and homogeneous distribution of precipitation greatly inhibited crack propagation and led to higher impact toughness.


Type
Novel Synthesis and Processing of Metals
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2020

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