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The relationship between indentation and uniaxial creep in amorphous selenium

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

W.H. Poisl
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering. University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
W.C. Oliver
Affiliation:
Nano Instruments, Inc., 1001 Larson Drive, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831
B.D. Fabes
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
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Abstract

Ultralow load indentation techniques can be used to obtain time-dependent mechanical properties, termed indentation creep, of materials. However, the comparison of indentation creep data to that obtained during conventional creep testing is difficult, mainly due to the determination of the strain rate experienced by the material during indentation. Using the power-law creep equation and the equation for Newtonian viscosity as a function of stress and strain rate, a relationship between indentation strain rate, , and the effective strain rate occurring during the indentation creep process is obtained. Indentation creep measurements on amorphous selenium in the Newtonian viscous flow regime above the glass transition temperature were obtained. The data were then used to determine that the coefficient relating indentation strain rate to the effective strain rate is equal to 0.09, or .

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1995

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