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Phase evolution of solid-state BaTiO3 powder prepared with the ultrafine BaCO3 and TiO2

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 August 2012

Ting-Tai Lee
Affiliation:
Department of Resources Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan; and MLCC R & D Division, Yageo Corporation, Kaohsiung 81170, Taiwan
Chi-Yuen Huang*
Affiliation:
Department of Resources Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan
Che-Yuan Chang
Affiliation:
Department of Resources Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan
I-Kuan Cheng
Affiliation:
MLCC R&D Division, Yageo Corporation, Kaohsiung 81170, Taiwan
Ching-Li Hu
Affiliation:
MLCC R&D Division, Yageo Corporation, Kaohsiung 81170, Taiwan
Chun-Te Lee
Affiliation:
MLCC R&D Division, Yageo Corporation, Kaohsiung 81170, Taiwan
Masayuki Fujimoto
Affiliation:
MLCC R&D Division, Yageo Corporation, Kaohsiung 81170, Taiwan
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: cyhuang@mail.ncku.edu.tw
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Abstract

The phase evolution, nucleation, and sintered ceramics of barium titanate (BaTiO3, BT) powder prepared by solid-state synthesis with an ultrafine starting material (27 m2/g of BaCO3 and 190 m2/g of TiO2) were investigated in this study. Surface diffusion between BaCO3 and TiO2 was observed at a relatively low temperature of 400 °C by transmission electron microscopy. Rapid nucleation of the BT and cubic BT phases was observed at 500 °C by x-ray diffraction. The derivative thermogravimetry curve clearly shows a single step of BT formation at 600 °C. In short, pure BT particles with an average particle size of 250 nm and high tetragonality were prepared by solid-state synthesis, which produced X7R ceramics with high dielectric permittivity, high insulation resistance, and a clear core–shell structure.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Phase evolution of solid-state BaTiO3 powder prepared with the ultrafine BaCO3 and TiO2
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