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Nonlinear physical properties of some nonconventional semiconducting Bi–Pb–Ba–O glasses

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

D. K. Modak
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
G. Banerjee
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
M. Karar
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
M. Sadhukhan
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
A. K. Bera
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
B. K. Chaudhuri
Affiliation:
Solid State Physics Department, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta-700 032, India
P. K. Pal
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, R.B.C. College, Naihati, West Bengal, India
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Abstract

Semiconducting Bi1−xPbxBaO3−δ (or BPB) glasses with x = 0 to 0.8 have been prepared by fast quenching from the melt. Interesting anomalies in the temperature-dependent polaronic conductivity and dielectric constant have been observed in all these glass compositions at temperatures, Tp, varying from 310 to 330 K (depending on Pb concentration). This nonlinear behavior is considered to be associated with the local ordering or the displacements of the BiO3 type pyramidal structural units present in the glass matrix (observed from the infrared spectra of these glasses). This type of ordering/displacement gives rise to a local instability in the glass network structure which is also supported by the observed heat capacity anomaly around the same temperatures Tp.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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