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Nanotribological properties of few layer graphene surfaces, prepared by bottom-up and top-down methods, in ambient air and liquid environments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2016


Konstantinos A. Sierros
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506, USA
Sai Suvineeth Ramayanam
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506, USA
Charter D. Stinespring
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506, USA
Corresponding

Abstract

The role of bottom-up and top-down synthesis methods on the nanotribological response of few layer graphene (FLG) in air and various liquid environments is reported. Oxidized FLG adhesion against Si increases by a factor of 2 as compared to non-oxidized samples. Also, it is reported that the FLG center-to-edge adhesion typically exhibits a decreasing tendency. In air, a highly lubricious nanotribological response (0.03–0.04) of both bottom-up and top-down prepared samples is measured. The frictional behavior of bottom-up synthesized FLG in different liquid environments is found to depend on the absence or presence of viscous aggregates in the respective liquid. A Stribeck-like behavior is suggested for viscous synthetic lubricants, such as silicone, present as the third body in the FLG/Si tip system. Such nanoscale behavior, indicating transitions in different lubrication regimes, may be particularly important for the further understanding of liquid–graphene interfaces in novel tribological and device applications.


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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

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