Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-559fc8cf4f-28jzs Total loading time: 0.915 Render date: 2021-03-01T23:32:26.244Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

Morphology of melt-crystallized poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) thin films studied by transmission electron microscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2012

Masaki Tsuji
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Polymer Condensed States, Division of States and Structures III, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011, Japan
Fernando A. Novillo L
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Polymer Condensed States, Division of States and Structures III, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011, Japan
Masahiro Fujita
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Polymer Condensed States, Division of States and Structures III, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011, Japan
Syozo Murakami
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Polymer Condensed States, Division of States and Structures III, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011, Japan
Shinzo Kohjiya
Affiliation:
Laboratory of Polymer Condensed States, Division of States and Structures III, Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto-fu 611-0011, Japan
Get access

Extract

Thin films of poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) (PEN) were isothermally crystallized at 190 °C after being melted at 300 °C. Morphological observation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the spherulitic texture in the films. Selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) indicated that the crystals in the films are the a form, as expected from our thermal condition for crystallization. The SAED pattern from the untilted specimen was characterized by the fairly intense reflection ring accompanied by other weak rings, and this intense ring was indexed as 010. A series of SAED patterns, which were obtained from the same specimen area tilted at various angles in the TEM column, suggested that the crystallites are oriented with their (001) planes being preferentially parallel to the film surface. Subsequently, a set of the dark-field images of the two-dimensional spherulite taken by using two different parts of the 010 reflection ring revealed that most of the crystallites in such a spherulite are oriented with their (010) planes being parallel in its radial direction. In addition, the spherulites in small pieces (0.05–0.08 mm thick) of PEN, which had been crystallized under the same thermal condition as above, were determined to be negatively birefringent by polarizing light microscopy.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1.Ouchi, I. and Noda, H., Sen'i Gakkaishi 29, P-405 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Hamano, H., Hosoi, M., Saeki, Y., Kobayashi, I., and Etchu, M., J. Magnetics Soc. Jpn. 15(Suppl.), 435 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Nakamae, K., Nishino, T., Tada, K., Kanamoto, T., and Ito, M., Polymer 34, 3322 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Kumakawa, S. and Komoriya, T., Japan Patent 87/156312 (1987).Google Scholar
5.Uchida, Y., Nikkei Mater. Technol. 137, 63 (1994);Google Scholar
Yasufuku, S., IEEE Elec. Insul. Mag. 12, 8 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Mencik, Z., Chem. Prum. 17, 78 (1967).Google Scholar
7.Zachmann, H.G., Wiswe, D., Gehrke, R., and Riekel, C., Makromol. Chem., Suppl. 12, 175 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Buchner, S., Wiswe, D., and Zachmann, H.G., Polymer 30, 480 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Cakmak, M., Wang, Y.D., and Simhambhatla, M., Polym. Eng. Sci. 30, 721 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10.Murakami, S., Nishikawa, Y., Tsuji, M., Kawaguchi, A., Kohjiya, S., and Cakmak, M., Polymer 36, 291 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Cakmak, M. and Lee, S. W., Polymer 36, 4039 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Murakami, S., Yamakawa, M., Tsuji, M., and Kohjiya, S., Polymer 37, 3945 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Ulcer, Y. and Cakmak, M., Polymer 35, 5651 (1994); J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 62, 1661 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Ulcer, Y. and Cakmak, M., Polymer 38, 2907 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Iizuka, N. and Yabuki, K., Sen'i Gakkaishi 51, 463 (1995).Google Scholar
16.Nagai, A., Murase, Y., Kuroda, T., Matsui, M., Mitsuishi, Y., and Miyamoto, T., Sen'i Gakkaishi 51, 470 (1995); 51, 478 (1995).Google Scholar
17.Matsui, M., Murase, Y., Ohwaki, S., Iohara, K., and Miyamoto, T., Kobunshi Ronbunshu 53, 294 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Ghanem, A. M. and Porter, R. S., J. Polym. Sci.: Part B: Polym. Phys. 27, 2587 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Ito, M., Honda, K., and Kanamoto, T., J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 46, 1013 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.Nakamae, K., Nishino, T., and Gotoh, Y., Polymer 36, 1401 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Desai, A. B. and Wilkes, G.L., J. Polym. Sci.: Symp., No. 46, 291 (1974);Google Scholar
Makarewicz, P. J. and Wilkes, G. L., J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 22, 3347 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22.Cheng, S.Z.D and Wunderlich, B., Macromol. 21, 789 (1988).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23.Jakeways, R., Klein, J. L., and Ward, I.M., Polymer 37, 3761 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24.Spies, C. and Gehrke, R., Macromol. 30, 1701 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
25.Mary, D., Albertini, M., and Laurent, C., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30, 171 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
26.Ouchi, I., Hosoi, M., and Matsumoto, F., J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 20, 1983 (1976);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Allen, N. S. and McKellar, J. F., J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 22, 2085 (1978);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Scheirs, J. and Gardette, J-L., Polym. Degradation Stability 56, 339 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
27.Morikawa, J. and Hashimoto, T., Polymer 38, 5397 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28.Xu, W., Asai, S., and Sumita, M., Sen'i Gakkaishi 52, 631 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
29.Sata, H., Kimura, T., Ogawa, S., Yamato, M., and Ito, E., Polymer 37, 1879 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
30.Kimura, F., Kimura, T., Sugisaki, A., Komatsu, M., Sata, H., and Ito, E., J. Polym. Sci.: Part B: Polym. Phys. 35, 2741 (1997).3.0.CO;2-9>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
31.Yamanobe, T., Matsuda, H., Imai, K., Hirata, A., Mori, S., and Komoto, T., Polym. J. 28, 177 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
32.Doerlitz, H. and Zachmann, H. G., J. Macromol. Sci. Phys. B36, 205 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
33.Guo, M. and Zachmann, H. G., Polymer 34, 2503 (1993);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ihm, D.W., Park, S. Y., Chang, C.G., Kim, Y. S., and Lee, H. K., J. Polym. Sci.: Part A: Polym. Chem. 34, 2841 (1996);3.0.CO;2-U>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Okamoto, M. and Kotaka, T., Polymer 38, 1357 (1997);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lee, S.C., Yoon, K. H., Park, I. H., Kim, H. C., and Son, T. W., Polymer 38, 4831 (1997).Google Scholar
34.Guo, M. and Zachmann, H.G., Macromol. 30, 2746 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
35.Yoon, K.H., Lee, S. C., and Park, O. O., Polym. J. 26, 816 (1994);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yoon, K.H., Lee, S. C., and Park, O. O., Polym. Eng. Sci. 35, 1807 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
36.Jang, S.H. and Kim, B. S., Polym. Eng. Sci. 35, 538 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
37.Kit, K.M., Schultz, J. M., and Gohil, R.M., Polym. Eng. Sci. 35, 680 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
38.Jackson, W.J. Jr., Macromol. 16, 1027 (1983).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
39.Chen, D. and Zachmann, H.G., Polymer 32, 1612 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
40.Balta Calleja, F.J., Santa Cruz, C., Chen, D., and Zachmann, H.G., Polymer 32, 2252 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
41.Lu, X. and Windle, A. H., Polymer 36, 451 (1995).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
42.Yonetake, K., Yashiro, H., Ueda, M., and Masuko, T., Polymer 38, 2461 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
43.Niino, H., Yabe, A., Nagano, S., and Miki, T., Appl. Phys. Lett. 54, 2159 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
44.Hirata, A., Fuchigami, T., and Komoto, T., Polym. Prepr. Jpn. 42, 1406 (1993).Google Scholar
45.Sakai, Y., Imai, M., Kaji, K., and Tsuji, M., Macromol. 29, 8830 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
46.Huijts, R.A. and Peters, S. M., Polymer 35, 3119 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
47.Carr, P.L., Zhang, H., and Ward, I. M., Polym. Adv. Technol. 7, 39 (1996).3.0.CO;2-A>CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 12 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 1st March 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Morphology of melt-crystallized poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) thin films studied by transmission electron microscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Morphology of melt-crystallized poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) thin films studied by transmission electron microscopy
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Morphology of melt-crystallized poly(ethylene 2,6-naphthalate) thin films studied by transmission electron microscopy
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *