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Mass density of glassy Pd80Si20 during low-temperature light ion irradiation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

G. Schumacher
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439
R. C. Birtcher
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439
L. E. Rehn
Affiliation:
Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439
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Abstract

Changes in mass density of amorphous Pd80Si20 were monitored in situ during irradiation with He2+ and H+ ions at temperatures below 100 K and during subsequent thermal treatment. The mass density decreased with increasing ion fluence and exponentially approached a saturation value of −1.2%, corresponding to a recombination volume of 190 atomic volumes. The initial swelling rate was 2.3 atomic volumes/displaced atom. The mass density of the irradiated material increased during subsequent thermal treatment, and the irradiation-induced decrease of the mass density recovered completely at room temperature.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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Mass density of glassy Pd80Si20 during low-temperature light ion irradiation
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