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Kinetic control of CeO2 nanoparticles for catalytic CO oxidation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2019

Bingqi Han
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
Huixia Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
Liping Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
Yan Wang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
Yuelan Zhang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
Guangshe Li*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: guangshe@jlu.edu.cn
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Abstract

This article reports on the growth kinetics of cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles prepared via a sintering method. By varying the sintering temperatures and periods of time, particle size of CeO2 nanoparticles was tuned from 11 to 100 nm. Ostwald ripening mechanism prevails in the growth process, and the growth kinetics is determined to follow an equation, D5 = 16.25 + 3.6 × 1020 exp(−344.20/RT) in the temperature range of 700 to 1000°C. After dispersing Pt on CeO2 nanoparticles, the size effect for the catalytic performance of the CO oxidation reaction was researched. When temperature and period of time are set at 700 °C and 2 h, respectively, dispersion of Pt onto CeO2 nanoparticles led to the largest quantity of chemisorbed oxygen species on the surface and the best catalytic performance. The findings reported here would provide a feasible path for the preparation of advanced catalysts in the future and moreover to discover novel size-dependent supports for many catalytic applications.

Type
Invited Feature Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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This paper has been selected as an Invited Feature Paper.

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Supplementary material: File

Han et al. supplementary material

Tables S1-S3 and Figures S1-S3

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