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Immobilization of hemoglobin on stable mesoporous multilamellar silica vesicles and their activity and stability

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Yufang Zhu
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of China
Weihua Shen
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of China
Xiaoping Dong
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of China
Jianlin Shi
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, People’s Republic of China
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Abstract

A stable mesoporous multilamellar silica vesicle (MSV) was developed with a gallery pore size of about 14.0 nm. A simulative enzyme, hemoglobin (Hb), was immobilized on this newly developed MSV and a conventional mesoporous silica material SBA-15. The structures and the immobilization of Hb on the mesoporous supports were characterized with x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and so forth. MSV is a promising support for immobilizing Hb due to its large pore size and high Hb immobilization capacity (up to 522 mg/g) compared to SBA-15 (236 mg/g). Less than 5% Hb was leached from Hb/MSV at pH 6.0. The activity study indicated that the immobilized Hb retained most peroxidase activity compared to free Hb. Thermal stability of the immobilized Hb was improved by the proctetive environment of MSV and SBA-15. Such an Hb-mesoporous support with high Hb immobilization capacity, high activity, and enhanced thermal stability will be attractive for practical applications.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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