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Helical etch channels in quartz

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

John Ballato
Affiliation:
Department of Ceramic and Materials Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854–8065
Richard E. Riman
Affiliation:
Department of Ceramic and Materials Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 607 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854–8065
John R. Vig
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Communications–Electronics Command, AMSEL-RD-C2–CS, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703–5603
Sally M. Laffey
Affiliation:
U.S. Army Communications–Electronics Command, AMSEL-RD-C2–CS, Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703–5603
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Abstract

Helical etch channels were found to form in α-quartz when treated with anhydrous HF vapor at 400 °C. Both hydrogen and fluorine species were determined to play an important role in helix formation. Crystal orientation, quartz source, etch channel density, and surface pretreatments had no influence. Helix formation was altogether arrested when water was present in the etch vapor. The genesis of the helices remains unknown.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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