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GeOx and SiOx nanowires grown via the active oxidation of Ge and Si substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 July 2011

Avi Shalav
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
Gabriel H. Collin
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
Yi Yang
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia; and School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094, China
Taehyun Kim
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
Robert G. Elliman
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia
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Abstract

In this study, we show that the volatile monoxide species generated during the active oxidation of Ge and Si substrates can be utilized in the presence of Au catalytic nanoparticles to nucleate and grow GeOx and SiOx nanowires. A simple thermodynamic model is developed to ascertain the critical O2 partial pressure as a function of temperature required for the active oxidation of Ge and Si substrates and is experimentally verified. The ideal conditions for uniform nanowire growth across the substrate are shown to be primarily dependent on the O2 partial pressure, the annealing temperature and thicknesses of the surface oxide, and deposited Au. The role of a metastable surface oxide separating the active oxidation and NW nucleation processes is also discussed.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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