Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-8dvf2 Total loading time: 0.293 Render date: 2022-10-05T09:55:07.140Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Electron microscopy of high-temperature and high-pressure as-grown diamond crystals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Long-Wei Yin*
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 73 Jing Shi Road, Jinan 250061, People's Republic of China
Mu-Sen Li
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 73 Jing Shi Road, Jinan 250061, People's Republic of China
Jian-Jun Cui
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 73 Jing Shi Road, Jinan 250061, People's Republic of China
Bin Xu
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 73 Jing Shi Road, Jinan 250061, People's Republic of China
Jian-Hong Gong
Affiliation:
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 73 Jing Shi Road, Jinan 250061, People's Republic of China
Zhao-Yin Hao
Affiliation:
National Key Laboratory for Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People's Republic of China
Jiong-Fa Zhang
Affiliation:
Occupational College, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Jinan, 271021, People's Republic of China
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: yinlw@sdu.edu.cn
Get access

Abstract

Electron microscopy was used to investigate microstructures of diamond single crystals prepared at high temperature and high pressure (HPHT) from the Fe–Ni–C system. Analysis through selected-area electron diffraction pattern suggests that the crystal structure of the HPHT-grown diamond is cubic; polycrystalline diamonds are contained in the diamond. Etch pits on the (111) surface of the diamond by scanning electron microscopy revealed the dislocation motion under the action of applied stress. An array of parallel dislocation lines taken with reflection of [110] was observed directly by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fringe distortions and concentric dislocation loops were examined by rotation moiré images, which arose from two overlapping (111) close-packed planes rotated with respect to each other at a 5° angle. The parallel dislocation lines, distorted fringes, and concentric dislocation loops might have derived from the micro-inclusions. The parallel layers with growth cellular interface by TEM provided direct evidence that the diamond grew from solution of carbon in the molten catalyst at HPHT and the growth interface diamond was not stable.

Type
Rapid Communications
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

REFERENCES

1.Bundy., F.P., Hall., H.M., and Strong., H.M., Nature 176, 51 (1955).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Alder., B.J. and Christian., R.R., Phys. Rev. Lett. 7, 367 (1961).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3.Bundy., F.P., J. Chem. Phys. 38, 631 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4.Kanda, H., Akaishi, M., and Yamaoka, S., Appl. Phys. Lett. 65, 784 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5.Derjaguin., B.V., Spitsyn., B.V., Gorodetksy., A.E., Zakharov., A.P., Bouilov., L.I., and Aleksenko., A.E., J. Cryst. Growth 31, 44 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Nakazawa, H., Kanazawa, Y., Kamo, M., and Osumi, K., Thin Solid Films 151, 199 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7.Lauten., F.S., Shigesato, Y., and Sheldon., B.W., Appl. Phys. Lett. 65, 210 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Zhang, Y., Zhang, F., and Chen, G., J. Mater. Res. 9, 2845 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Hao., Z.Y., Chen., Y.F., and Chen., L.Z., J. Cryst. Growth. 135, 370 (1994).Google Scholar
10.Michau, D., Kanda, H., and Yamaoka, S., Diamond Relat. Mater. 8, 1125 (1999).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11.Zhu, W., Radzian., A.R., and Messier, R., J. Mater. Res. 4, 659 (1989).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Williams., B.E., Kong., H.S., and Glass., J.T., J. Mater. Res. 5, 801 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Koike, J., Mitchell., T.E., and Parkin., D.M., Appl. Phys. Lett. 59, 2515 (1991).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Shechtman, D., Feldman, A., and Vandin., M.D., Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 487 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
15.Theory of Dislocations, edited by Hirth., J.P. and Lothe, J. (McGraw–Hill, New York, 1968).Google Scholar
16.Seki, Y., J. Phys. Soc. Japan. 8, 149 (1953).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Pashley., D.W., Menter., J.W., and Bassett., G.A., Nature 179, 752 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Bassett., G.A., Menter., J.W., and Pashley., D.W., Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 246, 345 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Yin., L.W., Zou., Z.Z., and Li., M.S., Mater. Sci. Eng. A293, 106 (2000).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.Frank, C. and Read., W.T., Phys. Rev. 79, 722 (1950).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Imperfections in Nearly Perfect Crystals, edited by Bardeen, J. and Herring, C. (Wiley, New York, 1952).Google Scholar
22.Hunt., J.D., Jackson., K.A., and Brown, H., Rev. Sci. Inst. 37, 805 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23.Mourachov, S. and Poliakov, V., Diamond Relat. Mate. 7, 309 (1998).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Electron microscopy of high-temperature and high-pressure as-grown diamond crystals
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Electron microscopy of high-temperature and high-pressure as-grown diamond crystals
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Electron microscopy of high-temperature and high-pressure as-grown diamond crystals
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *