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Effect of prestrain on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aged Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al alloy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Jun Sun*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, People’s Republic of China
Peng Ge
Affiliation:
Northwest Institute for Nonferrous Metal Research, Xi’an 710016, People’s Republic of China
*
a) Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: junsun@mail.xjtu.edu.cn
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Abstract

The effect of prestrain on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aged Ti–10V–2Fe–3Al alloy was investigated. The results showed that prestrain caused the tensile strength to decrease by 5%, but the elongation to fracture significantly improved by about 200%, in comparison with the unstrained samples, using a much shorter aging time. Transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that nano-sized alpha (α) particles homogeneously precipitated in the beta (β) matrix, and continuous α films formed along grain boundaries in the unstrained and aged samples. However, in the prestrained samples, the coarse stress induced martensite laths decomposed into α- and β-phases in the form of alternately arranged plates, which suppressed formation of the continuous grain boundary α films during aging. The hardness of the prestrained samples was lower than that of the unstrained samples after the same aging treatments. The enhancement of ductility can be mainly attributed to the suppression of grain boundary α films and the reduced hardness in prestrained samples.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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