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Effect of pH on ceria–silica interactions during chemical mechanical polishing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 May 2005

Jeremiah T. Abiade
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Particle Engineering Research Center, Gainesville, Florida 32611
Wonseop Choi
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Particle Engineering Research Center, Gainesville, Florida 32611
Rajiv K. Singh
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Particle Engineering Research Center, Gainesville, Florida 32611; and Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78758
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Abstract

To understand the ceria–silica chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) mechanisms, we studied the effect of ceria slurry pH on silica removal and surface morphology. Also, in situ friction force measurements were conducted. After polishing; atomic force microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy were used to quantify the extent of the particle–substrate interaction during CMP. Our results indicate the silica removal by ceria slurries is strongly pH dependent, with the maximum occurring near the isoelectric point of the ceria slurry.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2005

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