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The effect of Hf and Ti additions on microstructure and properties of Cr2Nb–Nb in situ composites

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

B.P. Bewlay
Affiliation:
General Electric Company, Corporate Research and Development Center, P. O. Box 8, Schenectady, New York 12301
M. R. Jackson
Affiliation:
General Electric Company, Corporate Research and Development Center, P. O. Box 8, Schenectady, New York 12301
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Abstract

The present paper describes the effect of Hf and Ti additions on the microstructures and mechanical properties of two-phase composites based on the Cr2Nb–Nb eutectic. The microstructures of directionally solidified in situ composites containing 50–70% by volume of the Laves phase Cr2Nb which was modified with Hf (7.5–9.2%) and Ti (16.5–26%) are described. Partitioning of Hf and Ti between the two phases is discussed using microprobe and EDS results. The tensile properties at 1100 and 1200 °C are described and compared with those of an analogous niobium silicide-based composite. The Cr2(Nb)–(Nb) composite tensile yield strengths at 1200 °C were increased over that of monolithic Cr2Nb to ∼130 MPa. However, at 1200 °C the yield strengths of the silicide-based composites were approximately twice those of the Cr2(Nb)–(Nb) composites.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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