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Development of semi-interpenetrating polymer networks and quantum dots–polymer nanocomposites for low-cost, flexible OLED display application

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2012

Lihua Zhao
Affiliation:
Hewlett-Packard Labs, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 94304
Zhang-Lin Zhou
Affiliation:
Hewlett-Packard Labs, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 94304
Zengshan Guo
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
Gary Gibson
Affiliation:
Hewlett-Packard Labs, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 94304
James A. Brug
Affiliation:
Hewlett-Packard Labs, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 94304
Sity Lam
Affiliation:
Hewlett-Packard Labs, Hewlett-Packard Company, Palo Alto, California 94304
Jian Pei
Affiliation:
The Key Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China
Samuel S. Mao
Affiliation:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720
Corresponding
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Abstract

Recently, tremendous progress has been made toward the application of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in full color flat panel displays and other devices. This article reviews and discusses our recent progress in extended development of emissive semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (E-semi-IPNs) and hybrid quantum dots (QDs)–polymer nanocomposites for use in multicolor and multilayer OLED pixels through low-cost solution processing. Our semi-IPNs with high solvent resistance, containing an inert polymer network and conjugated polymers, served in different layers of OLED devices. These semi-IPNs do not require complicated chemical modification to OLED materials; therefore, many state-of-the-arts conjugated polymers can be utilized to achieve red–green–blue and white OLEDs by tuning formulations. Our research findings on hybrid QD–oligomer nanocomposites lead to the successful design and synthesis of QD–polymer hybrid nanocomposites, which were used to build proof-of-the-concept devices showing good promise in providing excellent color purity and stability from QDs and solution processability from hybrid nanocomposites.

Type
Invited Feature Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Development of semi-interpenetrating polymer networks and quantum dots–polymer nanocomposites for low-cost, flexible OLED display application
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