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Development of laboratory x-ray fluorescence holography equipment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Yukio Takahashi
Affiliation:
Graduate School, Department of Materials Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980–8579, Japan
Kouichi Hayashi
Affiliation:
Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980–8577, Japan
Kimio Wakoh
Affiliation:
Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980–8577, Japan
Naomi Nishiki
Affiliation:
Production Engineering Laboratory, Matsushita Electric Industrial Company, Ltd., Kadoma 571–8501, Japan
Eiichiro Matsubara
Affiliation:
Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980–8577, Japan
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Abstract

Laboratory x-ray fluorescence holography equipment was developed. A single-bent graphite monochromator with a large curvature and a high-count-rate x-ray detection system were applied in this equipment. To evaluate the performance of this equipment, a hologram pattern of a gold single crystal was measured. It took two days, which was about one-third the time required for the previous measurements using the conventional x-ray source and several times that using the synchrotron source. The quality of the hologram pattern is as good as that obtained using the synchrotrons. Clear atomic images on (002) are reconstructed.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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