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Conventional Vickers and true instrumented indentation hardness determined by instrumented indentation tests

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Seung-Kyun Kang
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, Korea
Ju-Young Kim*
Affiliation:
Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91106
Dongil Kwon
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744, Korea
*
a)Address all correspondence to this author. e-mail: juyoung1@snu.ac.kr
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Abstract

We evaluate Vickers hardness and true instrumented indentation test (IIT) hardness of 24 metals over a wide range of mechanical properties using just IIT parameters by taking into account the real contact morphology beneath the Vickers indenter. Correlating the conventional Vickers hardness, indentation contact morphology, and IIT parameters for the 24 metals reveals relationships between contact depths and apparent material properties. We report the conventional Vickers and true IIT hardnesses measured only from IIT contact depths; these agree well with directly measured hardnesses within ±6% for Vickers hardness and ±10% for true IIT hardness.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

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