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Compressive response of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films gleaned from in situ flat-punch indentations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 November 2012

Siddhartha Pathak
Affiliation:
Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, California 91125
Nisha Mohan
Affiliation:
Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, California 91125
Parisa Pour Shahid Saeed Abadi
Affiliation:
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Samuel Graham
Affiliation:
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332; and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Baratunde A. Cola
Affiliation:
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332; and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332
Julia R. Greer
Affiliation:
Materials Science, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, California 91125
Corresponding
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Abstract

We report the mechanical behavior of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films, grown on Si substrates using atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition, subjected to in situ large displacement (up to 70 μm) flat-punch indentations. We observed three distinct regimes in their indentation stress–strain curves: (i) a short elastic regime, followed by (ii) a sudden instability, which resulted in a substantial rapid displacement burst manifested by an instantaneous vertical shearing of the material directly underneath the indenter tip by as much as 30 μm, and (iii) a positively sloped plateau for displacements between 10 and 70 μm. In situ nanomechanical indentation experiments revealed that the shear strain was accommodated by an array of coiled carbon nanotube “microrollers,” providing a low-friction path for the vertical displacement. Mechanical response and concurrent deformation morphologies are discussed in the foam-like deformation framework with a particular emphasis on boundary conditions.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Pathak et al. supplementary movie

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Pathak et al. supplementary movie

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