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Boron loss in furnace- and laser-fired, sol-gel derived borosilicate glass films

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

D. J. Taylor
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
D. Z. Dent
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
D. N. Braski
Affiliation:
High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831
B.D. Fabes
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721
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Abstract

Borosilicate glass films were made by the sol-gel method from tetraethoxysilane and trimethylborate precursors. The precursor or glass composition at each stage of processing was analyzed to determine the sources of boron loss. The films were heated in a furnace and with a laser to compare boron volatilization by the two heating methods. The films were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, induction-charged plasma spectroscopy, and Auger microscopy. The highest losses of boron occurred during coating and low temperature (<500 °C) furnace firing. Films with the highest boron concentrations were made by dip coating and rapid firing, either with a laser or by placing them into a hot furnace. Infrared spectroscopy revealed Si–O–B bonds, indicating incorporation of boron into the borosilicate glass structure for laser- and furnace-fired films.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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Boron loss in furnace- and laser-fired, sol-gel derived borosilicate glass films
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