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Amino acid–intercalated layered double hydroxide core @ ordered porous silica shell as drug carriers: Design and applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 November 2019

Jianqiang Wang
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Wenpei Zhang
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Lifeng Hao
Affiliation:
Department of Engineering, Qiuzhen School, Huzhou University, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000, China
Jun Sun
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Wenqi Zhang
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Cheng Guo
Affiliation:
School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Yuhan Mu
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Light Industry, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Weiting Ji
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Light Industry, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Caiyuan Yu
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Light Industry, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Fangming Yuan
Affiliation:
College of Food Science and Light Industry, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816, China
Corresponding
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Abstract

A nanoparticle-based drug delivery system is first established by mesoporous silica encapsulating amino acid–intercalated layered double hydroxide (LDH) to construct nanocomposites AA-LDH@MS. The amino acids including phenylalanine (Phe) and histidine (His) with aromatic groups are intercalated into LDH as the cores Phe-LDH and His-LDH. These nanocomposites AA-LDH@MS display multispaces of the interlayer spaces of LDH and porous channels of mesoporous silica to load drugs. Moreover, amino acid molecules provide the interaction sites to improve effectively loading amounts of drugs. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is used as the cargo molecules to observe the delivery in vitro. The results indicate that the maximum loading amounts of drugs are up to 392 mg/g at 60 °C for 12 h in the nanocomposite Phe-LDH@MS. All the nanocomposites exhibit the sustained release of 5-FU at pH 4 and pH 7.4. The Korsmeyer–Peppas model is used to fit the kinetic plot of the drug release in vitro, which concludes that 5-FU release from AA-LDH@MS belongs to Fickian diffusion.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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