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Aging Characteristics of a Hybrid Sol-gel Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 Precursor Solution

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Timothy J. Boyle*
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard, SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Duane Dimos
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank NE, Mail Stop 1405, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87715
Robert W. Schwartz
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard, SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
Todd M. Alam
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank NE, Mail Stop 1405, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87115
Michael B. Sinclair
Affiliation:
Sandia National Laboratories, 1515 Eubank NE, Mail Stop 1405, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87115
Catherine D. Buchheit
Affiliation:
Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, 1001 University Boulevard, SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106
*
a)Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
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Abstract

The “aging” characteristics of an acetic acid/methanol solvent-based lead zirconate titanate (PZT) precursor solution, prepared by the Inverted Mixing Order (IMO) process, have been studied for an extended period of time. The changes in film properties were characterized using optical microscopy, optical scattering, and ferroelectric testing. Films generated from the IMO process exhibit an increase in thickness as a function of solution age due to chemical “aging” (esterification) of the precursor solution. This increased thickness results in a decrease in the microstructural uniformity, which affects the electrical and optical properties. In order to understand and eventually control this phenomenon, we have quantified the “aging” of this solution using a variety of analytical methods, including 1H NMR spectroscopy, pH measurements, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It is of note that we have discovered a method that circumvents this “aging” problem by removal of the volatile material, forming an IMO powder which can be redissolved to produce high quality PZT thin films whenever desired.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1997

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References

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