Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Exploring with Māori organizations comparative advantage in the context of climate change

  • Elizabeth Beall (a1) and John Brocklesby (a1)

Abstract

This paper reports on a project conducted with representatives of indigenous Māori organizations that are active in New Zealand land-based sectors. The primary aim of the research was to assist these organizations in thinking about their current and future positioning with regard to climate change. Using Peter Checkland’s Soft Systems Methodology as a broad framework for the research, the paper first seeks to capture some of the likely issues that enable and constrain strategic activity in the climate change arena. It then uses various soft systems modelling tools to research and structure a debate to consider the desirability and feasibility of particular interventions.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Exploring with Māori organizations comparative advantage in the context of climate change
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Exploring with Māori organizations comparative advantage in the context of climate change
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Exploring with Māori organizations comparative advantage in the context of climate change
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Corresponding author: john.brocklesby@vuw.ac.nz

References

Hide All
Berkes, F. (2009). Indigenous ways of knowing and the study of environmental change. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 39(4), 151156.
Brocklesby, J., & Beall, E. (2017). Processes of engagement and methodology design in community operational research - insights from the indigenous people’s sector. European Journal of Operational Research, https://doi.org/10.1016/jejor.2017.07.053.
Chant, L. (2009. Discourses on indigeneity: The media, the warrior gene and aggressive Caucasians. MAI Review, 2009, Issue 2, Peer Commentary. Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://review.mai.ac.nz/index.php/MR/article/view/253/273.
Checkland, P. (1981). Systems thinking, systems practice. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Checkland, P. (2000). Soft systems methodology: A 30 year retrospective. Systems Research and Behavioural Science, 17(1), 1158.
Checkland, P. (2001). Soft systems methodology in action: Participative creation of an information strategy for an acute hospital. In J. Rosenhead, & J. Mingers (Eds.), Rational analysis for a problematic world revisited (pp. 91114). Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Checkland, P., & Howell, S. (1998). Information, systems and information systems making sense of the field. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Checkland, P., & Poulter, J. (2006). Learning for action: A short definitive account of Soft Systems Methodology and its use for practitioners, teachers, and students. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Checkland, P., & Scholes, J. (1990). Soft systems methodology in action. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Cummings, S. (2002). Recreating strategy. London: Sage.
Cummings, S., & Angwin, D. (2015). Strategy builder: How to create and communicate more effective strategies. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons.
Davies, L., & Ledington, P. (1991). Information in action: Soft systems methodology. London: McMillian Education Ltd.
Durie, M. (2003). The business ethic and Māori development. In M. Durie (Ed.), Nga kahui pou launching Māori futures (pp. 241252). Wellington, New Zealand: Huia.
Glover, M. (2002). Kaupapa Māori health research methodology: A literature review and commentary on the use of a kaupapa Māori approach within a doctoral study of Māori smoking cessation (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). University of Auckland, Auckland.
Harmsworth, G. (2002). Indigenous concepts, values and knowledge for sustainable development: New Zealand case studies. Paper presented at the 7th Joint Conference: Preservation of Ancient Cultures and the Globalization Scenario, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.
Hawken, P., Lovins, A., & Lovins, L.H. (1999). Natural capitalism: Creating the next industrial revolution. Boston, MA: Little Brown and Co.
Henderson, M., & Thompson, D. (2003). Values at work: The invisible threads between people, performance, and profit. Auckland: Harper Collins.
Jahnke, H., & Taiapa, J. (2003). Māori research. In C. Davidson, & M. Tolich (Eds.), Social science research in New Zealand: Many paths to understanding (pp. 3950). Auckland: Pearson.
Karaitiana, T. (2010). Key components of intergenerational wealth creation: Strategies for Māori economic entities responsible for taonga tuku iho. Paper presented at Sustainable Futures with Māori Lands, Whenua Conference Rotorua, New Zealand.
King, D., Penny, G., & Severne, C. (2010). The climate change matrix facing Māori society. In R. A. C. Nottage, D. S. Wratt, J. F. Bornman, & K. Jones (Eds.), Climate change adaptation in New Zealand: Future scenarios and some sectoral perspectives (pp. 100111). Wellington, New Zealand: New Zealand Climate Change Centre.
Klein, U. (2000). Belief-views on nature – Western environmental ethics and Māori worldviews. New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law, 4(2), 81119.
Lash, J., & Wellington, F. (2007). Competitive advantage on a warming planet. Harvard Business Review, 2007, 112.
Love, M., & Love, T. (2005). Māori and self-employment. In C. Massey (Ed.), Managing a small enterprise in New Zealand (pp. 250260). Auckland, New Zealand: Pearson Education New Zealand Ltd.
Mataira, P. (2000). Māori Entrepreneurship: The articulation of leadership and the dual constituency arrangements associated with Māori enterprise in a capitalist economy (Unpublished doctoral dissertation). Massey University, Palmerston North.
Miller, D. (2005). Western and Māori values for sustainable development. FIRST Foundation, Young Māori Leaders Conference Proceedings. Retrieved October 23, 2017, from http://www.firstfound.org/david%20miller.htm.
Osterwalder, A., & Pigneur, Y. (2010). Business model generation. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
O’Sullivan, J., & Dana, T. (2008). Redefining Māori economic development. International Journal of Social Economics, 35(5), 364369.
Petrie, H. (2006). Chiefs of industry: Māori tribal enterprise in early colonial New Zealand. Auckland, New Zealand: Auckland University Press.
Raymond, C. M., Fazey, I., Reed, M. S., Stringer, L. C., Robinson, G. M., & Evely, A.C. (2010). Integrating local and scientific knowledge for environmental management. Journal of Environmental Management, 91(8), 1766--1777.
Scrimgeour, F., & Iremonger, C. (2004). Māori sustainable economic development in New Zealand: Indigenous practices for the quadruple bottom line. Hamilton: University of Waikato.
Sibbet, D. (2013). Visual leaders: New tools for visioning, management, and organizational change. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Smith, L. (2005). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. London: Zed Books.
Stevens, S. (1997), Conservation through cultural survival: indigenous peoples and protected areas. Washington DC: Island Press.
Stuart, I. (2002). Māori and mainstream: Towards bicultural reporting. Pacific Journalism Review, 8(1), 4258.
Takino, N. (1998). Academics and the politics of reclamation. Paper presented at Te oru rangahau Māori Research and Development Conference, Massey University, Palmerston North.
Tunks, A. (1997). Tangata whenua ethics and climate change. New Zealand Journal of Environmental Law, 1(1), 67123.
Ulrich, W. (1993). Some difficulties of ecological thinking, considered from a critical systems perspective: A plea for critical holism. Systems Practice, 6(6), 583611.
Walker, S., Eketone, A., & Gibbs, A. (2006). An exploration of kaupapa Māori research, its principles, processes and applications. International Journal of Social Research Methodologies, 9(4), 331344.
Williams, R. (2005). Soft systems methodology. The Kellogg Foundation, Kapiti, New Zealand. Retrieved October 23, 2017, from https://www.researchgate.net/file.PostFileLoader.html.

Keywords

Exploring with Māori organizations comparative advantage in the context of climate change

  • Elizabeth Beall (a1) and John Brocklesby (a1)

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed