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Using Performance Measures to Assess Performance of Indoor and Outdoor Aquatic Centres

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2016

Gary Howat
Affiliation:
School of Management, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia, Phone: + 61 83025326, Fax:, + 61 8 302 5082, Email: gary.howat@unisa.edu.au
Gary Crilley
Affiliation:
School of Management, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia, Phone: + 61 83025163, Fax:, + 61 8 302 5082, Email: gary.crilley@unisa.edu.au
Duncan Murray
Affiliation:
School of Management, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095, Australia, Phone: + 61 8 302 3164, Fax:, + 61 83025255, Email: duncan.w.murray@unisa.edu.au

Abstract

A recent trend throughout Australia has been to develop multi-purpose indoor public aquatic centres in favour of outdoor pools. Such major policy and planning decisions often rely on consultants' feasibility studies, yet there is limited comprehensive industry-wide data available on which to base such decisions. The industry-wide performance measures discussed in this paper help fill this void by providing objective data to support the contention that multi-purpose indoor aquatic centres tend to outperform centres with solely outdoor pools. The key indicators of performance are based on financial viability and community participation data for a sample of Australian public aquatic centres.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press and Australian and New Zealand Academy of Management 2005

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