Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Lessons from the English auxiliary system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 March 2019

IVAN A. SAG
Affiliation:
Stanford University
RUI P. CHAVES
Affiliation:
University at Buffalo, SUNY
ANNE ABEILLÉ
Affiliation:
Université Paris Diderot–Paris 7
BRUNO ESTIGARRIBIA
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina
DAN FLICKINGER
Affiliation:
Stanford University
PAUL KAY
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley
LAURA A. MICHAELIS
Affiliation:
University of Colorado Boulder
STEFAN MÜLLER
Affiliation:
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
GEOFFREY K. PULLUM
Affiliation:
University of Edinburgh
FRANK VAN EYNDE
Affiliation:
University of Leuven
THOMAS WASOW
Affiliation:
Stanford University
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Image of the first page of this article
Type
Corrigendum
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

doi:10.1017/S002222671800052X, published online by Cambridge University Press, 3 January 2019.

In the Journal of Linguistics article ‘Lessons from the English auxiliary system’, by Ivan A. Sag, Rui P. Chaves, Anne Abeillé, Bruno Estigarribia, Dan Flickinger, Paul Kay, Laura A. Michaelis, Stefan Müller, Geoffrey K. Pullum, Frank Van Eynde & Thomas Wasow, the first sentences immediately following example (1) should read as follows:

There are of course many other distinctive properties of the English auxiliary system (EAS). One that to our knowledge has remained unaccounted for in analyses of the EAS – including Hudson (1976a), Gazdar et al. (1982), Starosta (1985), Lasnik (1995), Lasnik et al. (2000), Kim & Sag (2002), and Freidin (2004) – is that auxiliary do is ‘necessary whenever it is possible’ (Grimshaw 1997).

References

Sag, Ivan A., Chaves, Rui P., Abeillé, Anne, Estigarribia, Bruno, Flickinger, Dan, Kay, Paul, Michaelis, Laura A., Müller, Stefan, Pullum, Geoffrey K., Van Eynde, Frank & Wasow, Thomas. Lessons from the English auxiliary system. Journal of Linguistics, doi:10.1017/S002222671800052X. Published online by Cambridge University Press, 3 January 2019.Google Scholar

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 171
Total number of PDF views: 547 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 04th March 2019 - 25th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Access
Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-t2lmn Total loading time: 0.527 Render date: 2021-01-25T21:31:46.441Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "1", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Lessons from the English auxiliary system
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Lessons from the English auxiliary system
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Lessons from the English auxiliary system
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *