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Pharmaceutical Innovation: Law & the Public's Health

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

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Abstract

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Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2009

References

See generally Outterson, K., “Pharmaceutical Arbitrage: Balancing Access and Innovation in International Prescription Drug Markets,” Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law & Ethics 5, no. 1 (2005): 193291.Google Scholar
Hunt, P., “Human Rights Guidelines for Pharmaceutical Companies in Relation to Access to Medicines,” draft for consultation, September 19, 2007.Google Scholar
Bessen, J. and Meurer, M. J., Patent Failure: How Judges, Bureaucrats, and Lawyers Put Innovators at Risk (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).Google Scholar
PhRMA, Pharmaceutical Industry Profile (2009).Google Scholar
Kesselheim, A. S. and Avorn, J., “Using Patent Data to Assess the Value of Pharmaceutical Innovation,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 176183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flynn, S., Hollis, A. and Palmedo, M., “An Economic Justification for Open Access to Essential Medicine Patents in Developing Countries,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 184208.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bird, R. C., “Developing Nations and the Compulsory License: Maximizing Access to Essential Medicines While Minimizing Investment Side Effects,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 209221.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lybecker, K. M. and Fowler, E., “Compulsory Licensing in Canada and Thailand: Comparing Regimes to Ensure Legitimate Use of the WTO Rules,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 222239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sonderholm, J., “Wild-Card Patent Extensions as a Means to Incentivize Research and Development of Antibiotics,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 240246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reichman, J. H., “Comment: A Trilogy of Views about Compulsory Licensing of Patented Pharmaceutical Inventions,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 247263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kapczynski, A., “Commentary: Innovation Policy for a New Era,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 264668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leonard, E. W., “Right to Experimental Treatment: FDA New Drug Approval, Constitutional Rights, and the Public's Health,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 269279.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Noah, B. A., “Just a Spoonful of Sugar: Drug Safety for Pediatric Populations,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 280291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crager, S. E. and Price, M., “Prizes and Parasites: Incentive Models for Addressing Chagas Disease,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 292304.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Patsner, B., “Riegel v. Medtronic, Inc.: Revisiting Pre-emption for Medical Devices,” Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37, no. 2 (2009): 305317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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