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Electronic Informed Consent in Mobile Applications Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2021

Abstract

The article covers electronic informed consent (eIC) from different dimensions so that practitioners might understand the history, regulation, and current status of eIC. It covers the transition of informed consent to electronic screens and the implications of that transition in terms of design, costs, and data analysis. The article explores the limits of regulation mandating eIC for mobile application research, and addresses some of the broader social context around eIC.

Type
Symposium Articles
Copyright
Copyright © American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2020

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