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The use of Merocel nasal packs in the treatment of epistaxis

  • M. B. Pringle (a1), P. Beasley (a1) and A. P. Brightwell (a1)

Abstract

Over the period of a year, Merocel nasal packs were used routinely as the primary form of packing in patients referred to the hospital with epistaxis that had not resolved with simple measures, and in whom packing was thought to be required. Their effectiveness was assessed. The packing was usually performed by inexperienced senior house officers. The Merocel packs successfully controlled bleeding in 91.5 per cent of the patients in whom they were used. Use of the correct insertion technique is very important but is very easy to learn and perform. The actual insertion takes only a couple of seconds. Discomfort during insertion, whilst in situ and on removal was assessed.

Merocel nasal packing is an effective form of first line treatment in patients with epistaxis.

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Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: Mr M. Pringle, F.R.C.S. (ORL), ENT Senior Registrar, Dept of Otolaryngology, St Michaels Hospital, Southwell Street, Bristol, BS2 8EG.

References

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Breda, S. D., Jacobs, J. B., Lebowitz, A. S., Tierno, P. M. (1987) Toxic shock syndrome in nasal surgery: A physiochemical and microbiological evaluation of Merocel and Nu gauze nasal packing. Laryngoscope 97: 13881391.
Davis, J. P. (1993) Respiratory obstruction associated with the use of the Brighton epistaxis balloon. Journal of Laryngology and Otology 107: 140141.
Garth, R. J. N., Brightwell, A. P. (1994) A comparison of packing materials used in nasal surgery. Journal of Laryngology and Otology 108: 564566.
Jacobson, J. A., Kasworm, E. M. (1986) Toxic shock syndrome after nasal surgery. Archives of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery 112 (3): 329332.
McFerran, D. J., Edmonds, S. E. (1993) The use of balloon catheters in the treatment of epistaxis. Journal of Laryngology and Otology 107: 197200.
McGarry, G. W., Aitken, D. (1991) Intranasal balloon catheters: How do they work? Clinical Otolaryngology 16: 388392

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