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Primary respiratory support in preterm infants with cleft lip and palate

  • F Eifinger, R Lang-Roth, B Braumann, M Saffar, C Huenseler and A Kribs...

Abstract

Objective:

Preterm infants with respiratory distress are routinely treated by application of nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure. In preterm infants with cleft lip and palate, nasal mask attachment is not feasible due to air leakage through the cleft defect. Here, we describe a modified continuous positive airway pressure application method that overcomes this problem.

Design and subjects:

Observation study, university neonatal intensive care unit. The neonates (n = 4) were between 28 and 33 weeks' gestation and weighed 1160 to 1680 g at birth. Immediately after birth, infants with unilateral cleft lip and palate (n = 3) were respiratory stabilised by a Medijet™ generator using a nasal tube. To minimise the pressure cap, hydrocolloid bandages were adhered over the total cleft defect. Immediately after orthodontic passive palatal plates insertion (within 27 hours of life), the nasal tube was removed and continuous positive airway pressure was applied through a nasal mask covering the complete nose of the infant.

Results:

The system proved suitable for patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate for whom the generated nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure remained constant between 5 to 7 cm of water but failed in the patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate. None of the patients had to be ventilated due to respiratory failure, and all survived to discharge.

Conclusion:

Preterm infants with unilateral, but not bilateral cleft lip and palate, can be successfully stabilised using the described nasal mask continuous positive airway pressure system, thereby avoiding primary intubation and its associated risk of complications.

Copyright

Corresponding author

Address for correspondence: F Eifinger, Department of Neonatology and Paediatric Intensive Care, University Children's Hospital, 50924 Cologne, Germany. Fax: 49 221 478 6451 E-mail: Frank.Eifinger@uk-koeln.de

References

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2 McMahon, RM, Bagchi, I, Worsey, S, Kumararatne, B. Use of mask continuous positive airway pressure in a preterm infant presenting with bilateral cleft lip and palate. J Laryngol Otol 2006;120:228–9
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4 Kribs, A, Pillekamp, F, Hunseler, C, Vierzig, A, Roth, B. Early administration of surfactant in spontaneous breathing with nCPAP: feasibility and outcome in extremely premature infants (postmenstrual age </=27 weeks). Paediatr Anaesth 2007;17:364–910.1111/j.1460-9592.2006.02126.x
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6 Hotz, M, Gnoinski, W. Comprehensive care of cleft lip and palate children at Zurich university: a preliminary report. Am J Orthod 1976;70:48150410.1016/0002-9416(76)90274-8
7 Drake, AF, Davis, JU, Warren, DW. Nasal airway size in cleft and noncleft children. Laryngoscope 1993;103:915–1710.1288/00005537-199308000-00014
8 Sandham, A, Solow, B. Nasal respiratory resistance in cleft lip and palate. Cleft Palate J 1987;24:278–85

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Primary respiratory support in preterm infants with cleft lip and palate

  • F Eifinger, R Lang-Roth, B Braumann, M Saffar, C Huenseler and A Kribs...

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