Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Hearing and vestibular rehabilitation, with a focus on the elderly
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Hearing and vestibular rehabilitation, with a focus on the elderly
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Hearing and vestibular rehabilitation, with a focus on the elderly
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

The increasing proportion of our patients in the ‘elderly’ age group in the developed world has effects on ENT as well as every other branch of medicine. In The Journal of Laryngology & Otology in the recent past, we have looked at a variety of topics of particular interest to the otolaryngologist and geriatrician, including pharyngeal pouch, 1 vestibular dysfunction and presbyacusis, 2 , 3 and cochlear implantation. 4 In this issue, an auditory brainstem response study focuses on the mechanism of hearing difficulty in the elderly, especially in noisy surroundings, comparing the elderly and young adults. 5 This revealed significantly lower amplitudes and increased latencies in brainstem responses in the elderly, indicating that subcortical mechanisms are involved in this deficiency. With regard to the frequent need for vestibular rehabilitation therapies in the elderly, it is disappointing but perhaps not surprising that elderly males are apparently more likely to fail to complete vestibular rehabilitation programmes than their younger counterparts. 6 Vestibular rehabilitation programmes may not be inexpensive, but bone-anchored hearing aids are an established and necessarily expensive aid to hearing impairment rehabilitation. The review paper from Manchester helps us to understand why the take-up of this technology is not always as high as might be hoped for. 7 The authors call for much more evidence to help providers focus their efforts appropriately and to help patients take advantage of what could help them a great deal.

This issue of The Journal has papers on both adult and paediatric subglottic stenosis. Sharma and colleagues describe a decade of experience in balloon dilatation at Great Ormond Street Hospital, which has considerable advantages over open surgery in these challenging cases. 8 These authors provide practical guidance on the technique based on 166 cases. Nicolli and colleagues, from Pennsylvania, describe a retrospective case–control study in adults, in which they identify obesity and diabetes mellitus as risk factors for the development of subglottic stenosis. 9 These papers complement a paper from New Delhi published in 2014, which investigated the aetiology and management of subglottic stenosis. 10

Ear trauma is a topic that is often neglected. Song et al. help redress this with a detailed study of patients with temporal bone fractures that spare the otic capsule. 11 Happy reading!

References

1 Stewart, K, Sen, P. Pharyngeal pouch management: an historical review. J Laryngol Otol 2016;130:116–20
2 Tan, JL, Tang, J, Lo, S, Yeak, S. Investigating the risk factors of vestibular dysfunction and the relationship with presbyacusis in Singapore. J Laryngol Otol 2016;130:816–21
3 Luscher, M, Theilgard, S, Edholm, B. Prevalence and characteristics of diagnostic groups amongst 1034 patients seen in ENT practice for dizziness. J Laryngol Otol 2014;128:128–33
4 Hilly, O, Hwang, E, Smith, L, Shipp, D, Nedzelski, JM, Chen, JM et al. Cochlear implantation in elderly patients: stability of outcome over time. J Laryngol Otol 2016;130:706–11
5 Ansari, MS, Rangasayee, R, Ansari, MA. Neurophysiological aspects of brainstem processing of speech stimuli in audiometric-normal geriatric population. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:239–44
6 Soto-Varela, A, Faraldo-García, A, Del-Río-Valeiras, M, Rossi-Izquierdo, M, Vaamonde-Sánchez-Andrade, I, Gayoso-Diz, P et al. Adherence of older people with instability in vestibular rehabilitation programmes: prediction criteria. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:232–8
7 Powell, R, Wearden, A, Pardesi, SM, Green, K. Understanding the low uptake of bone-anchored hearing aids: a review. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:190201
8 Sharma, SD, Gupta, SL, Wyatt, M, Albert, D, Hartley, B. Safe balloon sizing for endoscopic dilatation of subglottic stenosis in children. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:268–72
9 Nicolli, EA, Carey, RM, Farquhar, D, Haft, S, Alfonso, KP, Mirza, N. Risk factors for adult acquired subglottic stenosis. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:264–7
10 Pookamala, S, Thakar, A, Puri, K, Singh, P, Kumar, R, Sharma, SC. Acquired subglottic stenosis: aetiological profile and treatment results. J Laryngol Otol 2014;128:641–8
11 Song, SW, Jun, BC, Kim, H. Clinical features and radiological evaluation of otic capsule sparing temporal bone fractures. J Laryngol Otol 2017;131:209–14