Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Contents:

Information:

  • Access

Actions:

      • Send article to Kindle

        To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

        Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

        Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

        Bone Conduction Implants in Pediatric Cholesteatoma Management
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Dropbox

        To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

        Bone Conduction Implants in Pediatric Cholesteatoma Management
        Available formats
        ×

        Send article to Google Drive

        To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

        Bone Conduction Implants in Pediatric Cholesteatoma Management
        Available formats
        ×
Export citation

Learning Objectives:

Introduction: The use of bone conduction hearing implants (BCI) to management hearing loss in children with cholesteatoma/CSOM has not been well studied. In particular, can the use of a BCI alter the surgical approach to cholesteatoma and result in better disease management? Are BCI-related complications in patients with cholesteatoma different than patients without cholesteatoma?

Methods: Following IRB approval, a 12 year retrospective chart review of our BCI population at a tertiary academic children's hospital was performed.

Results: 45 subjects were identified with mean age at implantation of 8.2 years (range 1.7 to 19.1 years). All subjects had a device implanted with a percutaneous abutment. In 8 subjects, a BCI was placed in conjunction with surgery for cholesteatoma or chronic suppurative OM.

In total, 58 BCI-related complications occurred in 29 subjects. The majority of the complications were related to skin infection or overgrowth: 18 events required oral antibiotic and/or office-based cauterization and 17 events required revision surgery (43% percent of patients). In the subjects with cholesteatoma, the mean age at implantation was 9 years (range 5–19 years). All 8 subjects with cholesteatoma were also syndromic (Down and Crouzon Syndrome). There was no difference in the complication rate found in subjects with or without cholesteatoma. The use of a BCI permitted alteration of the ear procedure (EAC closure or thick cartilage grafting) that resulted in dry/stable ears in all 8 subjects.

Conclusions: Children with recurrent cholesteatoma/CSOM and unfavorable clinical factors (syndromic) can benefit use of a BCI which then permits use of surgical procedures to better control their underlying ear disease. No postoperative complications occurred related to their ear disease and the rate of BCI-related complications was no different then in children without cholesteatoma.