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Relationship between clinical features and therapeutic approach for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo outcomes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 September 2013

K Otsuka
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
Y Ogawa
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
T Inagaki
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
S Shimizu
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
U Konomi
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
T Kondo
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
M Suzuki
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objective:

To examine the clinical features, age and gender distribution of patients, treatment methods, and outcomes of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

Methods:

This paper reports a review of 357 patients treated for this condition at a single institution over a duration of 5 years. Patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were divided into two groups: one group underwent the Epley manoeuvre and the other received medication. The lateral canal canalolithiasis patients were also divided into two groups: one underwent the Lempert manoeuvre and the other received medication. Lastly, the lateral canal cupulolithiasis patients were treated with medication and non-specific physical techniques.

Results and conclusion:

For patients with posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, resolution time was significantly shorter in the Epley manoeuvre group than in the medication group. For the lateral canal canalolithiasis patients, resolution time was significantly shorter in the Lempert manoeuvre group than in the medication group. Resolution time was significantly longer in the lateral canal cupulolithiasis patients than in the other patients. The average age of patients increased with the number of recurrences, as did predominance in females. Average age and rate of sensorineural hearing loss were significantly higher in patients with intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo compared with those in the curable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo group.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2013 

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References

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