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Invasive laryngeal candidiasis: a cause of stridor in the previously irradiated patient

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 June 2007

S. Ganesan
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Whipps Cross Hospital, Leytonstone, London, UK.
R.P.S. Harar
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Whipps Cross Hospital, Leytonstone, London, UK.
R. S. Dawkins
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Whipps Cross Hospital, Leytonstone, London, UK.
A. J. Prior
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology, Whipps Cross Hospital, Leytonstone, London, UK.
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Abstract

Upper airway obstruction is always a serious condition. In patients who have previously been irradiated for a laryngeal malignancy, it normally implies either residual or recurrent disease. We report a case of stridor due to invasive laryngeal candidiasis in a patient who had undergone radiotherapy for a T1a N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis eight months earlier. Extensive investigation failed to identify recurrence of disease and the patient responded to prolonged topical antifungal therapy. Infection with Candida species is most frequently found in debilitated or immunocompromised patients. Although cases of upper airway obstruction in children secondary to idiopathic laryngeal candidiasis have been reported, to our knowledge no such presentation has been described in adults. This report highlights the difficulty of diagnosis and treatment. Familiarity with candidal infection is important for early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Type
Clinical Records
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 1998

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