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Immunotherapy in head and neck cancer: current practice and future possibilities

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2008

F O Agada
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Postgraduate Medical Institute, University of Hull, UK
O Alhamarneh
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Postgraduate Medical Institute, University of Hull, UK
N D Stafford
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Postgraduate Medical Institute, University of Hull, UK
J Greenman
Affiliation:
Division of Cancer, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Postgraduate Medical Institute, University of Hull, UK
Corresponding
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Abstract

The survival of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has changed little over the last 30 years. However, with recent advances in the fields of cellular and molecular immunology, there is renewed optimism with regards to the development of novel methods of early diagnosis, prognosis estimation and treatment improvement for patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Here, we present a critical review of the recent advances in tumour immunology, and of the current efforts to apply new immunotherapeutic techniques in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

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Review Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2008

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