Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2013

C-H Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
H-T Hsu
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
P-Y Chen
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
L K Huon
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Y-Z Lin
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
S-H Hung
Affiliation:
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

Objective:

To investigate and compare the performance of head mirrors and headlights during otolaryngological examination.

Methods:

The illuminance and illumination field of each device were measured and compared. Visual identification and visual acuity were also measured, in 13 medical students and 10 otolaryngology specialists.

Results:

The illuminance (mean ± standard deviation) of the LumiView, Kimscope 1 W and Kimscope 3 W headlights and a standard head mirror were 352.3 ± 9, 92.3 ± 4.5, 438 ± 15.7 and 68.3 ± 1.2 lux, respectively. The illumination field of the head mirror (mean ± standard deviation) was 348 ± 29.8 grids, significantly greater than that of the Kimscope 3 W headlight (183 ± 9.2 grids) (p = 0.0017). The student group showed no statistically significant difference between visual identification with the best headlight and the head mirror (score means ± standard deviations: 56.2 ± 9 and 53.3 ± 14.1, respectively; p = 0.3). The expert group scored significantly higher for visual identification with head mirrors versus headlights (59.7 ± 3.3 vs 55.2 ± 5.8, respectively; p = 0.0035), but showed no difference for visual acuity.

Conclusion:

Despite the advantages of headlight illumination, head mirrors provided better, shadow-free illumination. Despite no differences amongst students, head mirrors performed better than headlights in experienced hands.

Type
Main Articles
Copyright
Copyright © JLO (1984) Limited 2013 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1ENT Today: An iconic tool: is there still a place for the head mirror? In: http://www.enttoday.org/details/article/836587/An_Iconic_Tool_Is_there_still_a_place_for_the_head_mirror.html [19 March 2012]Google Scholar
2Hannan, SA. The instrument that determined my practice. BMJ 2003;326:747CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3Mester, AF. Six great men in Hungarian otorhinolaryngology. Am J Otolaryngol 1982;3:6772CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4Danilova, MV, Bondarko, VM. Foveal contour interactions and crowding effects at the resolution limit of the visual system. J Vis 2007;7:118CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5Rowlands, J, Mal, R, Thornton, M. Headlight or head mirror? Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2006;263:601–2CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6Sjostrand, FS. Color vision at low light intensity, dark adaptation, Purkinje shift, critical flicker frequency and the deterioration of vision at low illumination. Neurophysiology at the nanometer range of neural structure. J Submicrosc Cytol Pathol 2003;35:117–27Google ScholarPubMed
7Hausner, HH. Human efficiency as a function of light and illumination. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1951;51:1166–78CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8Perrig, S, Kazennikov, O, Wiesendanger, M. Time structure of a goal-directed bimanual skill and its dependence on task constraints. Behav Brain Res 1999;103:95104CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 23 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 27th January 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Hostname: page-component-898fc554b-4dk4j Total loading time: 2.058 Render date: 2021-01-27T02:30:24.050Z Query parameters: { "hasAccess": "0", "openAccess": "0", "isLogged": "0", "lang": "en" } Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false }

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Head mirror versus headlight: illumination, visual identification and visual acuity for otolaryngological examination
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *