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Climate change, social policy, and global governance

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2020

Ian Gough*
Affiliation:
CASE London School of Economics, London, UK

Abstract

This paper considers the challenge to global social policy posed by global climate change. It sets side by side global social policies and global climate change policies, and surveys the governance of each. The first part summarises global social policy in recent years, distinguishing (1) the policies and practices pursued in the global arena, and (2) the structures of global governance and the role of significant global actors. The second part repeats this at a greater length for global climate change. The third part then considers the relationship between these two sets of policies/practices and governance structures, in particular the potential conflicts between the pursuit of social justice and environmental sustainability. It identifies two possible responses – compensation and co-benefits – and maps these onto current global actors, before concluding with a radical vision of eco-social policy.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Reproduced with permission of Palgrave Macmillan from ‘Transformations in Global and Regional Social Policies’ edited by Alexandra Kaasch and Paul Stubbs, Palgrave Macmillan, 2014

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