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The New Clinton Administration and the Caribbean: Trade, Security and Regional Politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Anthony T. Bryan
Affiliation:
North-South Center of the University of Miami (FL) and Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington (DC), Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars of the Smithsonian Institution, Institute of International Relations, University of the West Indies in Trinidad

Extract

Faced with rapid changes in the global system, most Caribbean countries may seem to be doing everything right. The English-speaking Caribbean countries, in particular, have been exemplary in their practice of democracy and political stability. Others, such as Suriname and Haiti, are nurturing new democratic regimes. Economically, the region has followed the neoliberal reform rule book and implemented policies mandated by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank. They have trimmed fiscal deficits, privatized state-owned commercial enterprises that were losing money, and liberalized their trading regimes. These measures have been implemented either by reform-minded governments or governments which have seen no alternative. Only Cuba continues to labor under a discredited, ideological model that does not encourage democracy, while its economy mirrors some version of “á la carte capitalism” in the face of an accelerated US embargo.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University of Miami 1997

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