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A Stress–Strain Relation for Dry Snow in Greenland and Antarctica

  • Chi-Hai Ling (a1), L.A. Rasmussen (a1) and Carl S. Benson (a2)

Abstract

A stress–strain relation for dry snow in Greenland and Antarctica was derived. When this relation is integrated, it gives snow density as a function of time. For given surface density, temperature, and accumulation, the age of snow layers can be obtained as a function of depth in the snow-pack. Calculations compare well with observations. With some knowledge of the temperature range in the upper layer of the snow-pack, calculation for density versus depth can also be improved over the results where such temperature information was not used.

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References

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