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Instruments and Methods: A Shear-creep System for Studying Grain-boundary Behaviour in Ice

  • M. Ignat (a1) and G. Ricou (a2)

Abstract

We present here a shear-creep apparatus. This has been designed to study grain-boundary behaviour in ice bi-crystals. The design and dimensions of this apparatus were determined by taking into account the results of earlier tests, performed on the same types of sample. Improvement with the new device is obtained; it allows a displacement with two degrees of freedom in the grain-boundary plane, and direct observations of micro-structural changes during the test.

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References

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Higashi, A. 1978 Structure and behaviour of grain boundaries in polycrystalline ice. J. Glaciol., 21(85), 589605.
Hondoh, T. 1986 In situ X–ray topographic observations of stress concentrations at a serrated grain houndary in ice under deformation. Proceedings of Jimis–4, 723729.
Hondoh, T. Higashi, A.. 1979 Anisotropy of migration and faceting of large–angle grain boundaries in ice bicrystals. Philos. Mag. A, 39(2), 137149.
Ignat, M. Frost, H.. 1987 Grain boundary sliding in ice. J. Phys. (Paris), 48, Colloq. Cl, 189195. (Suppl. au 3.)
Sabourin, L.. 1980 Fracture behavior of ice in Charpy impact testing. Crrel Rep. 8013.
Muguruma, J. 1969 Influence of the surface layer on the plastic deformation of ice single crystals. In Riehl, N., Bullemer, B., Engelhardt, H. eds. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Physics of Ice, Munich… 1968. New York, Plenum Press, 213216.
Pimienta, P. Unpublished. Étude du comportement mécanique des glaces polycristallines aux faibles contraintes: applications aux glaces des calottes polaires. (Thèse d’Université Grenoble, 1987)

Instruments and Methods: A Shear-creep System for Studying Grain-boundary Behaviour in Ice

  • M. Ignat (a1) and G. Ricou (a2)

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