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        “Fox Glacier” in Yukon Territory is now Rusty Glacier
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        “Fox Glacier” in Yukon Territory is now Rusty Glacier
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        “Fox Glacier” in Yukon Territory is now Rusty Glacier
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Sir,

Some of your readers will be delighted to learn that the glacier unofficially named “Fox Glacier” in Yukon Territory has now been officially named Rusty Glacier by the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names. The unofficially named “Jackal” and “Hyena Glaciers” are now officially Backe and Trapridge Glaciers respectively.

The designations “Fox”, “Jackal” and “Hyena” had respectable if not venerable roots. In 1963 Austin Post (personal communication) assigned these names for reference purposes to three small surging glaciers in the St Elias Mountains, Canada. The following year he completed a map on which these names were used, and although the map was not published it was widely circulated. Post was inspired to use canine names by the proximity of these glaciers to the unofficially named “Wolf Creek Glacier”, now Steele Glacier.

In 1968 Rusty Glacier was among a small number of Canadian glaciers selected for special study during the International Hydrological Decade; a substantial literature therefore exists in which the unofficial designation “Fox Glacier” was used. To prevent further confusion with other Fox Glaciers we have compiled a fairly complete list of these references, omitting annual reports on field work in the St Elias Mountain Ranges contained in the Annual Report of the Arctic Institute of North America, Arctic, the Canadian Alpine Journal, the Canadian Geophysical Bulletin, and Ice (Nielsen, 1968; Paterson, 1968; Meier and Post, 1969, p. 816–17; Nielsen, 1969; Post, 1969; Clarke and Classen, 1970; Crossley and Clarke, 1970; West and Krouse, 1970: Clarke, [1971]; Classen and Clarke, 1971; Collins, 1971; Krouse, [1971]; Paterson, 1971).

Reference

Clarke, G. K. C. [1971.] Temperature measurements in Fox Glacier, Yukon Territory. (In Demers, J., ed. Glaciers. Proceedings of the Workshop Seminar sponsored by Canadian National Committee for the International Hydrological Decade and assisted by University of British Columbia, September 24 and 25, 1970. Ottawa, Secretariat, Canadian National Committee for the International Hydrological Decade, p. 4748.)
Clarke, G. K. C., and Classen, D. F. 1970. The Fox Glacier project. Canadian Geographical Journal, Vol. 81, No. 1, p. 2629.
Classen, D. F., and Clarke, G. K. C. 1971. Basal hot spot on a surge type glacier. Nature, Vol. 229, No. 5285, p. 48183.
Collins, S. G. 1971. Exploration on a surging glacier. Explorers Journal, Vol. 49, No. 2, p. 12429.
Crossley, D. J., and Clarke, G. K. C. 1970. Gravity measurements on “Fox Glacier”, Yukon Territory, Canada. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 9, No. 57, p. 36374.
Krouse, H. R. [1971.] Application of isotope techniques to glacier studies. (In Demers, J., ed. Glaciers. Proceedings of the Workshop Seminar sponsored by Canadian National Committee for the International Hydrological Decade and assisted by University of British Columbia, September 24 and 25, 1970. Ottawa, Secretariat, Canadian National Committee for the International Hydrological Decade, p. 4959.)
Meier, M. F., and Post, A. S. 1969. What are glacier surges? Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 4, Pt, 2, p. 80717.
Nielsen, L. E. 1968. Some hypotheses on surging glaciers. Geological Society of America. Bulletin, Vol. 79, No. 9, p. 1195201.
Nielsen, L. E. 1969. The ice-dam, powder-flow theory of glacier surges. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, Vol. 6, No. 4, Pt. 2, p. 95561.
Paterson, W. S. B. 1968. Glacier surges. Canadian Alpine Journal, Vol. 51, p. 22023.
Paterson, W. S. B. 1971, Glacier surges. (In Fisher, M., ed. Expedition Yukon. Toronto, Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., p. 17477.)
Post, A. S. 1969. Distribution of surging glaciers in western North America. Journal of Glaciology, Vol. 8, No. 53, p. 22940.
West, K. E., and Krouse, H. R. 1970. H2 18O/H2 16O variations in snow and ice of the St. Elias Mountain Ranges (Alaska–Yukon border). (In Ogata, K., and Hayakawa, T., ed. Recent developments in mass spectroscopy. Tokyo, University of Tokyo Press, p. 72834.)